CAS Members
Feng Tian

Positions
Professor
Academic title
Professor
Phone
010-64888708
E-mail
goffice@nao.cas.cn
Website(s)
Mailing Address
National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Room A505, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China, 100012, 100013

Education and Career History
Education:
2005  Ph.D  Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder
2003  M.S.  Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder
2000  M.S.  Astrophysics     Beijing University
1997  B. S.  Astronomy       Beijing University
Appointments:
2012—  Professor Tsinghua University
2010—  Bairen Research Scientist  NAOC
2009—2011  Research Associate II   University of Colorado
2008—2009  Postdoc Research Associate  MIT
2006—2008  NASA postdoctoral fellow  NASA Astrobiology Institute
2005—2006   Research Associate I (Postdoc) University of Colorado
2001—2005  Research Assistant   University of Colorado


 


Research Fields
Evolution of planetary atmospheres,

Habitability of planets,

Comparative planetology


Current Research Project
Faint Young Sun problem, 

Exoplanet and Biosignature Detection,

Early Mars atmosphere photochemistry and climate,

Planetary Upper Atmosphere Modeling


Professional Leadership
Convener of special session “evolution of planetary atmospheres” in AGU Fall meeting Reviewer for Science, Space Science Review, A&A, GRL, Icarus, JGR-planets, Planetary and Space Science, etc. Reviewer for CAS, NSF, NASA LOC Chair of the 2013 CAS-ESA Mars Advanced School

Achievements
1.  Dr. Tian and his colleagues are the first group to calculate hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from early Earth’s atmosphere (Tian et al. Science, 2005). They found that the hydrogen content of early Earth’s atmosphere should have been in the range of 1% or higher, which would have facilitated the origin of life on early Earth.

2. Dr. Tian and his colleagues are the first group to calculate the responses of early Martian upper atmosphere to early solar EUV radiation (Tian et al. 2009). They found that early Mars should have lost large amount of carbon dioxide prior to 4 billion years ago and as a result Mars would not have been able to maintain a warm climate during the early Noachian epoch.

 

Honors and awards

National Research Council Research Associateship Award                             2005

NASA Team Achievement award to the Cassini UVIS team                                 2009

Selected Publication
E. Chassefière, E. Dartois, J-M. Herri, F. Tian et al. CO2–SO2 clathrate hydrate formation on early Mars. Icarus 223, 878 (2013)

K. France, J. L. Linsky, F. Tian, et al. TIME-RESOLVED ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF THE M-DWARF GJ 876 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM. ApJ 750, L32 (2012)

F. Tian, M.W. Claire, J.D. Haqq-Misra, M. Smith, D.C. Crisp, D. Catling, K. Zahnle, J.F. Kasting, Photochemical and Climate Consequences of Sulfur Outgassing on Early Mars. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 295, 412 (2010)

F. Tian, Thermal escape from super-Earth atmospheres in the habitable zones of M stars. ApJ 703, 905-909 (2009)

F. Tian, J.F. Kasting, S.C. Solomon, Thermal Escape of Carbon from the Early Martian Atmosphere. GRL 36, L02205, doi:10.1029/2008GL036513 (2009)

F. Tian, A.I.F. Stewart, O.B. Toon, K.W. Larsen, L.W. Esposito, Monte Carlo simulations of the Water Plumes on Enceladus, Icarus 188, 154-161 (2007)

F. Tian, O.B. Toon, A.A. Pavlov, H. DeSterck, A Hydrogen-Rich Early Earth Atmosphere, Science 308, 1014-1017 (2005)

F. Tian, O.B. Toon, A.A. Pavlov, H. DeSterck, Transonic Hydrodynamic Escape of Hydrogen from Extrasolar Planetary Atmospheres, ApJ, 621, 1049-1060 (2005)

Copyright © National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Address: 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China code: 100012
Tel: 010-64888708 E-mail: ccz@bao.ac.cn